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Originally published in Communities Digital News.

Last June, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed its Clean Power Plan as a nationwide regulation to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from electrical power plants. Comments to the EPA have now been submitted, and it’s not a surprise that a majority of state governments oppose the plan. In the best interests of US citizens, states should refuse to comply with the proposed EPA Clean Power Plan.

The Clean Power Plan (CPP), more formally named the §111(d) rule, Carbon Pollution Emission Guidelines for Existing Stationary Sources, calls for a 30 percent reduction in power plant emissions by the year 2030. The CPP sets specific CO2 reduction targets for each state, based on four building blocks: 1) improved efficiency of coal-fired power plants, 2) increased use of combined cycle natural gas power plants, 3) increased use of renewable and nuclear energy, and 4) increased energy efficiency by consumers and businesses. But the main thrust of the proposal is the shut-down and replacement of coal-fired power plants, which now provide about 40 percent of US electricity.

There are three major strikes against the Clean Power Plan. First, the authority assumed by the CPP is not granted to the EPA by the laws of the United States. Second, efforts to try to implement the CPP will degrade the finest electrical system in the world, hurting consumers and businesses. Third, if implemented, the CPP will not have a measurable effect on global warming.

The Clean Air Act of 1970 authorized the establishment of state and federal regulations to control air pollution, and established the EPA to implement requirements of the act. The Clean Air Act and its amendments of 1977 and 1990 authorize the EPA to establish national ambient pollution standards and to control pollution levels from individual facilities, but not to regulate state electricity markets. A September 2014 letter from 15 state governors stated that the EPA’s Clean Power Plan proposal, “not only exceeds the scope of federal law, but also, in some cases, directly conflicts with established state law.”

 

Read more here: http://wattsupwiththat.com/2015/03/19/states-should-defy-unlawful-epa-carbon-dioxide-rules/electrical-substation-near-denver-article-caption

Massachusetts state house snowThe record-shattering snow that has shut down Boston’s public transit system threatens to white out a global warming forum organized by Massachusetts Senate President Stanley Rosenberg (D, Amherst).

Rosenberg scheduled the forum for 1 PM Tuesday beneath the golden dome of the Massachusetts State House in Boston.

‘Rosenberg said the state has already seen how climate change is manifesting itself in the state with stronger storms, extreme temperatures, and a changing environment.’

Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker has declared a state of snow emergency and has shut down “non-essential” state services and buildings in four counties on Tuesday, including Suffolk County where the Boston global warming forum is scheduled to take place.

Inconveniently, Boston is in the midst of its snowiest winter in a century. The city hit 73″ inches of snow on Monday placing this year on the top ten list for snowiest winters on record, surpassing the 72.9″ recorded during the winter of 1903-1904.

– See more at: http://www.cfact.org/2015/02/10/snowmageddon-threatens-massachusetts-global-warming-forum/#sthash.A2cVI66x.dpuf