Texas Faces Power Shortages Possibly 10 Years Out

A new study suggests Texas may have to deal with with power shortages for the next 10 years or so (source:  The Statesman) . These power shortages would happen during peak demand periods each year. So for instance, on a very hot summer or very cold winter you can expect that would be the time when everybody’s power goes out.

This worse case scenario occurs because too many people are demanding electricity at the same time. Combine this increase in demand from an expanding population and economy in Texas with EPA actions preventing coal fired power plants from being built. It isn’t that Texas wants to pollute the environment, kill the elderly and poison small children.

The fact of the matter is that new coal technology allows for clean burning cheap coal to meet demand for electricity and still let everyone have affordable electricity.

It will always sound great to protect the elderly and the children and like you I want to do this as well but when the elderly and children are used in propaganda by green activists to the eventual hardship of every Texas power consumer someone needs to say something.

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas has hired an outside consultant that will be delivering a report on June 1 on how Texas can encourage the construction of new power plants.

Right now wholesale electricity prices are too low to attract investors in new electricity generation plants and you have the EPA to contend with if you mention the word, coal.

Remember at one time TXU was planning to create at least 11 new state of the art coal fired power plants and now look at the situation?

For now Texas must work to get more commercial and industrial customers to agree to interrupt their electricity usage during peak demand times in exchange for payment.

A noteworthy aspect to getting businesses to automate electricity curtailment is that in the process they sometimes create complete backup generation systems that can produce onsite electricity through natural gas and remain completely off the grid long term.

Hopefully we will see more off the grid electricity systems that are built for these individual facilities alleviating Texas electricity demand troubles.

You can learn more about commercial distributed generation systems and implementation in Texas by watching the video below.

Why Do Texas Churches Have High Demand Charges on Their Electric Bill?

Texas church demand charge The way the PUCT wrote the rules regarding peak demand charges and electric usage rates set by electric utilities like Oncor Electric Delivery allows for interpretation. As currently interpreted by electric utilities most churches pay unreasonably high demand charges even when little or no energy is used at their facility. The problem according to the TEPA organization and the Texas Baptist Christian Life Commission is that the rules have resulted in some unforeseen hardships on houses of worship. For instance, many churches are low load profile customers that may be above the 25% load factor rule but below 35%. Oncor already defines a low load factor customer as 40% and below. The TEPA organization or Texas Energy Professionals Association has requested that the rule by changed to make secondary voltage non-residential customers that are as much as 35% in load factor but still a low load profile customer avoid what are referred to as demand ratchets.

What is the Reason in the Current Law for Having Such High Demand Charges on Churches

The goal of the law was to make the demand charges for different load factors and the use of energy during peak demand periods a fair price for all non-residential accounts. What some believe has occurred is a harsh penalty on some places like many houses of worship who have to deal with a demand ratchet when their electric usage may peak on a Sunday but be flat to non-existent the rest of the week. The law was setup to be a one size fits all type of rule so it would spread out the penalty but in reality churches feel a huge brunt of these very high energy demand charges because of the unique characteristics of how they use energy during the week.

What is a Demand Ratchet?

A demand ratchet allows an electric utility to charge a minimum amount on your electric bill each month regardless of what you are actually using. They calculate this based on your highest peak month of the year and than take a percentage of that and charge you that as a monthly minimum. Your monthly minimum might be $300 – $500 and for some churches much more than this. Imagine paying this amount each month even during a month where you only used 900 kilowatt hours all month long! It can be shocking!

How Do you Lower the Demand Ratchet Penalty?

Many churches leave their current retail electric provider and try to find another one thinking that will fix their issue. This change in retail providers will do nothing to lower the demand ratchet problem. You may reduce the retail electric provider rate associated with the monthly kilowatt hours you use but the monthly minimum demand charge you pay will remain unaffected. In order to lower this demand ratchet amount currently you must show 11 months of historical change in your peak demand for electricity. A church many times has an annual load factor of 25 percent or lower. About 98% of churches fall under 35% for their load factor which is considered low as Oncor utility even defines 40% load factor as a low load profile. In this situation it makes sense to not penalize churches with super high minimum demand charges each month when they maintain a low load factor.

Churches are metered for demand by the electric utility in an unusual way from a churches perspective. The utility goes back historically and finds the highest kilowatts demanded in any one month. They bill a church a minimum percentage of this amount on their electric bill each month that could be in the range of a minimum fee like $300 – $500 and up. The problem is that a church is usually a fairly large facility and so it is capable of demanding quite a bit of energy all at one time if it needs to but that usually only lasts for the time of a service on Sunday on a hot summer day. If it is a hot Texas day and the AC equipment is old and outdated it might turn on and run all Sunday service long without ever cooling sufficiently. A peak demand might be reached that is extraordinarily high. So a church member donates 5 brand new high efficiency AC units so that doesn’t happen again. In the current law it does not matter what upgrades you made in efficiency. A new peak demand level has been reached and so for the next 11 month the church will have to pay $500 at minimum as their demand charge even if they use zero dollars in energy.  In order to lower the demand penalty number the church must lower that electricity KW demand number for the next 11 months and then the utility will make an adjustment lower in that demand charge.

What is Being Done to Change the Current Texas Church Energy Demand Charges?

A church that has a load factor of 25% or less is a low load factor church in the current PUCT rule but yet their is still a demand ratchet. A lot of law makers, organizations like TEPA, electric utilities, and city organizations are in agreement on changes that need to be made in the law specifically for churches because of their unique characteristics that are unlike most business uses of energy. This PUCT Substantive Rule 25.244 is attempting to dramatically change the law so that most churches will not have to deal with the huge hardship of paying an extra $300 – $500 in demand charges on their electric bill each month.

Will My Church Qualify as a Low Load Factor Church?

Many churches in the U.S. qualify as a low load factor non-residential electricity customer. Load factor is simply a way of describing how much energy was used in a time period, versus how much electricity would have been used, if the electric power had been turned on during a typical peak demand time for that customer. Many churches must work to avoid ever reaching a certain pinnacle of peak demand or that number could haunt you for the next 11 months as that is what your minimum demand charge is based off of. This long 11 month penalty is referred to as a demand ratchet.

How Do I Calculate My Churches Load Factor?

You can always contact your electric utility NOT your retail electric provider to find out what your load factor is and how they calculate it. Keep in mind if you signed up with a retail electric provider like Spark Energy, Bounce Energy, or Ambit Energy and live in Dallas you would call Oncor Electric Delivery to ask this question. If you signed up with one of these retail electric providers and live in Houston you would call Centerpoint Energy Utility.

The way Oncor and other electric utilities calculate the load factor percentage is by dividing the total kilowatt-hours consumed in a designated period such as a month by the product of the maximum demand in kilowatts and the number of hours in the month.

So let’s say we have a Texas church that uses 36,000 kWh in the month. We would divide that number by their peak demand which is 100 kW multiplied by 30 days multiplied by 24 hours in a day.

What you end up with is 36,000 kWh divided by 72,000 kWh which gives you a 50% load factor. What this means is that the church used 36,000 kWh and this was 50% of the total energy the electric utility planned to have available for this facility to use at the 100 kW demand level.

So Why Have Churches Been Cheated Out of So Much Money From Past Demand Charges?

The intended goal of the current demand ratchet rules was supposed to be a one size fits all approach but the law makers did not foresee how the special characteristics of a church would cause the law to significantly penalize a church compared to other nonresidential facilities.

You see the electric utility must plan at all occasions the likelihood that the church may need to hit that demand kW number of 100 kW. In order to offer this power guarantee to this facility they must charge a premium for this 100 kw high demand number that this church requires even though they don’t use a lot of monthly electric usage in kilowatt hours.

All electric utilities such as Oncor Electric or Centerpoint Energy must be able to meet peoples peak demand for electricity at all times or risk a blackout. When utilities structure in demand charges they can build up their infrastructure to offer this peak electric power when it is called for. This is why many churches in a city can open their doors on Sunday and turn on all their power at the same time and the city doesn’t have a resulting power outage.

The good news is that work is being done in the political arena for churches at the Public Utility Commission of Texas to make the case that churches that have a 25% and as much as a 35% or lower load factor should not have an 11 month demand ratchet in place. These demand ratchets make it harder for churches to work to lower their peak demand number because when they do make a change in the efficiency of their building they receive no reward for doing so unless they keep it low for the next 11 months.

Just as the PUCT has made changes to their energy demand penalty rules for certain agricultural businesses in Texas we believe there is a solid case for lowering energy demand penalties for Houses of Worship. The great news is that we even have the electric utilities on our side for changes to these laws for churches and they see that making these changes will not hurt their ability to provide reliable power to others on the Texas electric grid.

You can read more about the PUCT Substantive Rule 25.244 and a request from a local Texas christian organization to the PUCT …. click here for the Texas Baptist Christian Life Commission’s request to the PUCT

Electricity Bid helps you find an electric rate and provider to save you money and keep life simple.

Get in touch with us!